Friday, June 22, 2018

Ephemeral




"Life is too short".

I was watching something on television when one of the characters blurted those words.

A friend of mine recently died. Though I feel like I need to write about him to fully confront what happened, I don't think I'm quite ready. All I can think about right now are exactly those words: Life is too short. It was definitely too short for him.

We often say those words to preface things we waste time on. Life is too short to waste on anger; to waste on negative people; to waste on a job we hate; to worry about things we can't control, and so on and so forth. The subtext of course is that we don't want to be reckless with the limited time we have and more importantly, that we feel we don't have enough of it. 

But what if for some, life is just not short enough? With all the recent celebrity suicides and even for my friend who died suffering from cancer, death just could not come sooner. For some, they've had enough and couldn't take any more of life and everything it had to offer them. Maybe life offered them too much of what they didn't want and too little of what could have saved them and made them want to breathe longer. 

None of us are immune to complaints and darker shades of thought. On our more enlightened, grateful days, it's easier to see that life is too short and we're able to focus on what enriches us. But I'm certain there are days when everything just feels too exhausting and a faint voice awakens, saying that the only respite lies in a final surrender. It's a push and pull, seesaw struggle, and it's not always so easy to push against the ground to hoist ourselves toward happiness and contentment. But what might help, and what helps me, is precisely the idea that everything is ephemeral. Not one moment, whether of joy or sorrow, defines our lives. Make friends with 'This too, shall pass', and keep putting one foot in front of the other. Believe that everyone else is still just figuring things out no matter how put together they may seem. 

Everyone is on that seesaw ride and you just need to remind yourself of what the child in you has always known...that the most fun part of that ride is the push you can muster every time you hit rock bottom.















5 comments:

  1. Great analogy! I think when suffering from a terminal illness a shortened life is best for the person.

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    1. It may be an unpopular belief, but I agree with you. Sometimes, death is the kind reality. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and for stopping by, Haralee! Hope you're enjoying your summer! xoxo

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  2. Your metaphor of a seesaw is so true. We have to push forward. My husband has been fighting a chronic illness since he was in his fifties. We are still a loving couple. My mother fought dementia, and the day she lapsed into a coma she knew me and my brother--she pushed through to the end. Thank you.

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    1. Pushing through the end is difficult, esp with chronic illnesses. For the caregivers and loved ones, it's difficult to be watching but we too need to push through and find the strength. It's not always easy so hopefully, we can always find some inspiration to keep moving forward, no matter how small that inspiration may be. Thank you, Beth. xoxo

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